Greed and Fear

I am writing this blog at the end of what has been one of the most volatile weeks the stock market has experienced in a long time.  I am reasonably sure that my  retirement account has not done well. Last week over a lunch conversation a friend suggested that the primary forces driving the stock market are greed and fear.  Neither of us would claim to be financial experts, but greed and fear do seem to be motivators.  When things are going well it almost seems natural to want more and when things come apart fear influences everything.

Greed and fear influence much more than finances.  Think about our post 9-11 world.  As a nation we have made many fear-based decisions.  We have gone to war, declared entire nations to be our enemies, spied on our own people, and developed a quiet mistrust of people who fit a certain profile or worship differently.

There are those who would argue that all of this is a necessary evil.  To be honest there are times when I agree.  Who in their right mind thinks that terrorism should be normative?

As a Christian, I can’t help but wonder if the “Greed and Fear” pattern is unhealthy.  After all who in their right mind wants to live in a world controlled greed or fear?

There are other models.  In his book No Future without Forgiveness, Desmund Tutu lays out a strong case for a confront-and-forgive approach.  Can you imagine how our world would be different today if the leaders of our country had used this approach after 9-11?  Martin Luther King Jr. often spoke of the Beloved Community.  For King our mutual humanity transcended things like race, tribe, social class and nation.  King’s approach might be described as “speaking the truth yet non-violent.”  Can you imagine a world where this is the primary way to solve our disputes?

Greed and fear may be the primary motivators right now, but as followers of Jesus we are called to be transforming agents.

Silly Questions

May is not an easy month for me. It was in May 2003 that my mother passed away.  Recalling memories of her has become a May ritual for me. One childhood memory that has surfaced this year was a time when my mother, in a fit of frustration, demanded that I stop asking such silly questions. The other day USA Today ran a story asking if Osama bin Laden was in Hell.  The article goes on to speculate that this question has become a type of litmus test between traditional heaven-and-hell evangelicals and the emerging evangelical movement led by Rob Bell with its tendencies towards universalism.  The traditional argument in its simplest form goes something like this: if God is just, then it is not possible for bin Laden to end up in heaven.

I cannot help but wonder if this debate is a silly one.  After all, trying to figure out where someone else is going to spend eternity is a little like asking if Adam and Eve had belly buttons - a potentially  entertaining discussion but also a little silly.

Why is it so important to condemn someone else to hell?  There is a strange comfort in knowing there are people more sinful than I am.  It is reasonably safe to state that I am not, nor ever will be as sinful as Osama bin Laden was.

Is it possible that condemning someone else to hell is a convenient way to avoid dealing with the stuff in my life?  After all I have never master-minded a terrorist attack or sent someone on a suicide mission - so I can’t be all that bad of a person, right?

In light of what bin Laden has done my judgmentalism, anger and arrogance are just minor offenses that should be overlooked.

Enemy

This week President Obama announced that Osama bin Laden had been killed.  I remember September 11, 2001 like it was yesterday.  It wasn’t a fun day.  I was in a plane, flying from Ft Lauderdale to Chicago, when the first tower was struck.  I still remember being ordered out of our plane and eventually out of O’Hare airport.  I was one of the lucky few who managed to rent a car.  The 18 hour drive from Chicago to Denver was filled with all kinds of emotions.  What if I had been on one of those planes? Before the end of the year I was diagnosed with shingles.  The doctor said it was stress related.

I cannot say that I was ready to throw a party when I heard the news, but I did not shed any tears either.

How should people of faith respond when those who wish to do us harm are harmed?

Martin Luther King Jr. had an important perspective, “Returning hate for hate multiplies hate, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that. Hate multiplies hate; violence multiplies violence and toughness multiples toughness in a descending spiral of destruction."

I think that there is much wisdom in his words.